Skip to content

UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS

 

Who is a Commercial Operator?

If you have a small drone that is less than 55 pounds, you can fly for work or business by following 14CFR Part 107. A person or company using unmanned aircraft system/drone technology for compensation or business purposes is considered to be a commercial operator. This includes any person or company using a drone in any way to advertise, promote or demonstrate a product or service, even if the product or service itself does not include a drone, drone derived photography, etc.

Federal Restrictions & Requirements

If you have a small drone that is less than 55 pounds, you can fly for work or business by following 14CFR Part 107. A person or company using unmanned aircraft system/drone technology for compensation or furtherance of business is considered to be a commercial operator. This includes any person or company using a drone in any way to advertise, promote or demonstrate a product or service, even if the product or service itself does not include a drone, drone derived photography, etc.

Step 1: Learn the Rules

  • Make sure you understand what is and is not allowed under Part 107 rules. Review summary of the Part 107 rules
  • Research and understand Alaska laws, regulations, Airspace and No Drone zones for the safe operation of your UAS.

Step 2: Become an FAA-Certified Drone Pilot by Passing the Knowledge Test

Step 3: Register your Drone with the FAA

  • Registration costs $5 and is valid for 3 years. You'll need a credit or debit card and the make and model of your drone handy in order to register.
  • Visit dronezone.faa.gov and select "Fly sUAS under Part 107" to create an account and register your drone.
  • Once you've registered, mark your drone with your registration number in case it gets lost or stolen.

Remember:

  • Always be sure to fly your drone safely and within FAA guidelines and regulations.
  • It is up to you as a drone pilot to know the Rules of the Sky, and where it is safe to fly
  • Aren't sure if Part 107 is right for you and your operation? Try the user identification tool

Commercial operators can also operate drones under Special Authority for certain unmanned Aircraft Systems approved under Section 44807 of the Federal Aviation Administration Reauthorization Act of 2018. 44807 directs the Secretary of Transportation to determine if certain UAS can safely operate in the NAS even though they are not certified. To gain approval to operate an unmanned aircraft from the Secretary of Transportation, a person must apply for an exemption to certain regulations under 14 CFR Part 11.

As an alternative to operating under Part 107 or a Section 44807 exemption, a drone operator may apply for a federal Special Airworthiness Certificate from the Federal Aviation Administration.

LAANC logo31 Airports in Alaska are LAANC enabled. Be sure to use the appropriate app for your airspace authorizations

What is LAANC?

LAANC logoLAANC is the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability, a collaboration between FAA and Industry. It directly supports UAS integration into the airspace.

LAANC provides:

  • Drone pilots with access to controlled airspace at or below 400 feet.
  • Awareness of where pilots can and cannot fly.
  • Air Traffic Professionals with visibility into where and when drones are operating.

Updated: 06/08/2020

Note: Reference in this site to any specific commercial product, process, or service, or the use of any trade, firm or corporation name is for the information and convenience of the public, and does not constitute endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by DOT&PF.